Brokenness

Over the weekend we had a plumbing event-catastrophe would be a better way to describe it. I’ve almost caught up with the laundry and the carpets are now clean, but my shoulders are still sore from plunging the downstairs toilet for an hour and a half. To be honest, I’m not sure plunging the toilet that long did anything other than give me something to do in the height of crisis, but there is value in that. The best news is, by Saturday evening the water stopped leaking through the walls into the garage, and we were all reminded of an important life lesson: If you’re gonna laugh about it later, you might as well laugh about it now.

This is all to say that things have been a little hectic around here, and I’m still working on the follow up to last Thursday’s Preacher’s Kid post. It’s coming. I promise.

In the meantime, I thought I’d repost something from the early days of the blog (a-hem, December) for those of you who have just recently started reading along.

I hope you find it encouraging.

forty-one ten

You and I are broken people—disappointed, rejected, lonely, grieving. It is nothing to be ashamed of. Everyone we meet is broken.

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Author: Rebekah Durham

Rebekah Durham lives in Atlanta, Georgia with her three children.  She is a graduate of Columbia Theological Seminary and has written for numerous publications. She is an avid reader and in particular an admirer of C.S. Lewis, Thomas Merton, G.K. Chesterton, Henri Nouwen, and Dorothy L. Sayers (in no certain order). She'd also blindly follow Miss Marple (Agatha Christie's famous spinster sleuth) anywhere she wanted to go.

4 thoughts on “Brokenness”

  1. I am thrilled to find that you resume blogging! You certainly have a gift for it. You manage to express what I feel but cannot put into words. Keep challenging us to grow with your thought-provoking insights.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Plumbing problems can be miserable. I had spinal surgery years ago. About a week after I’d returned from the hospital, my toilet began overflowing. There I was in PJs and a body brace, frantically plunging (all the while terrified I would disrupt the surgical wound). It’s funny in retrospect. Thankfully, no harm was done. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

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