Quarantine Writing Project (QWP)-1

As promised here is my first journal entry about our time in Quarantine. If you want to join me in this Quarantine Writing Project, you can join the link party down below or link back to this post so we can all check out your blog and read what you have written (or drawn, painted, whatever)! Don’t have a blog? Feel free to post your writing in the comments.

April 7, 2020:   It’s hard to know what to do with myself. For years I’ve run around Continue reading “Quarantine Writing Project (QWP)-1”

The Quarantine Writing Project

I’ve written before about discovering the letters my grandfather wrote to my grandmother while stationed in France and Germany during World War II ( you can read about them here, here and here), and what a treasure it has been to read through those letters. They’ve given me a window into the past that history books, or even news articles from that time, could never offer. I’ve learned about their personal hopes and fears, what they saw, and how they managed each day.  I’ve read those letters dozens of times, and they never get old to me. They make me feel close to grandparents in a way I never did while they were living.

It occurred to me the other day that it would be such a shame Continue reading “The Quarantine Writing Project”

On Laughter and the Time My Father Fell Into a Grave

One of the things I’ve enjoyed most over the past few weeks is watching the ways in which people’s senses of humor have responded to the sudden challenges they face being quarantined, working from home, helping their children with online learning… There’s some really funny stuff out there, folks!

Some may argue that this light-heartedness during such immense suffering is a sign or our shallow flippancy and desperation for distraction- refusal to quiet ourselves in somber reflection and self-examination. I won’t try to argue that we are not all guilty of this to varying degrees. I suspect I am more guilty of this than most over the past few weeks. But I also still hold that laughter done well is a celebration of life. It is our refusal to concede to despair.

“Laughter is the sun that drives winter from the human face.”

Victor Hugo

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After last week’s post On Faux Pas and Grace I received several requests to tell the story of the time my father fell into a grave.

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Brokenness

Over the weekend we had a plumbing event-catastrophe would be a better way to describe it. I’ve almost caught up with the laundry and the carpets are now clean, but my shoulders are still sore from plunging the downstairs toilet for an hour and a half. To be honest, I’m not sure plunging the toilet that long did anything other than give me something to do in the height of crisis, but there is value in that. The best news is, by Saturday evening the water stopped leaking through the walls into the garage, and we were all reminded of an important life lesson: If you’re gonna laugh about it later, you might as well laugh about it now.

This is all to say that things have been a little hectic around here, and I’m still working on the follow up to last Thursday’s Preacher’s Kid post. It’s coming. I promise.

In the meantime, I thought I’d repost something from the early days of the blog (a-hem, December) for those of you who have just recently started reading along.

I hope you find it encouraging.

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You and I are broken people—disappointed, rejected, lonely, grieving. It is nothing to be ashamed of. Everyone we meet is broken.

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Faith in the Wilderness

Photo: Mount Nebo by Mira Pavlakovic

Last night I tried writing down some things I’ve been thinking regarding suffering and faithfulness to God during our times of spiritual wilderness, Continue reading “Faith in the Wilderness”

On Faux Pas and Grace

Last weekend my father told me a story about a minister friend of his whose wife, as he was preparing to serve communion, motioned to him from the front pew that the zipper to his pants was unzipped. Continue reading “On Faux Pas and Grace”

Lewis and Sayers: Blogs to Read

I came across some great articles in the blogosphere this week. Two in particular I want to share with you, mainly because they deal with a couple of my favorite authors: C.S. Lewis and Dorothy L. Sayers. Continue reading “Lewis and Sayers: Blogs to Read”